08 September, 2008

The King of the Fauves - Henri Matisse

The Goldfish, 1912
o/c, 146x97 cm
Matisse



Since the proto-colorists were called "Fauvists," it has been my long time goal to study that most-noted Fauve, Henri Matisse (1800-1950). Matisse persisted in his ultra colorful style even after the era of the short-lived Fauvist movement (1905-7), which featured stylized realism and assigned non-local color to objects.


The giant Pablo Picasso overshadowed Matisse as they both worked simultaneously to create Modern Art in the early part of the Twentieth Century. Picasso, the great Cubist, and Matisse, the father of Fauvism, were friendly rivals. The one brought us the line, the other brought us color in the Modern Art sense.

As I bring this study along, I will be writing reviews of the books and articles that I am reading, and I will generate a link list and a "Quick Key" button for this blog page that will lead you to the best Matisse info on the web.



Bibliography:

Matisse the Master: A Life of Henri Matisse: the Conquest of Colour, 1909-1954
By Hilary Spurling

The Unknown Matisse: A Life of Henri Matisse: the Early Years, 1869-1908
By Hilary Spurling

Matisse,
By Volkmar Essers




Matisse Factoids:


Rude patrons at a salon displaying Matisse paintings would openly revile his work, and
to amuse themselves would smear the still-wet paint with their fingers.

The Red Studio was voted the number 5 most influential Modern Artwork of all time by a panel of 500 art experts.


Like our hero, Mark Rothko, Matisse has a chapel. Don't you? Maybe I'll have to start a post about great artists and their chapels.

Part of Matisse's legacy has been his active progeny. One of his sons, Pierre Matisse, and his daughter, Marguerite, were influential in interpreting their father's works and life. Also, Pierre ran The Pierre Matisse Gallery, in New York City, which gave first-time exposure to a lexicon of notable Twentieth Century artists. His grandson, Paul, and his great granddaughter Sophie are active artists working in the US today.


6 comments:

Deborah Paris said...

Great post, Casey. BTW, I don't know if you watch the show Mad Men- its set in the early 60s-about post war culture and the advertising game- Last night, a "Rothko" was part of the episode!

Casey Klahn said...

No, but I looked it up. About ad men, I get it. Do they know Darren Stevens?

Katherine Tyrrell said...

Nice one Casey. I went to see The Fauves exhibition at the Royal Academy in duuuuh/tries to switch on brain cells but gets reject noise........a long time ago. Splendid stuff

Gesa said...

Very much looking forward to this. I love Matisse and the goldfish bowl is one of my favourites. I remember your wish to tell you more about the Scottish Colourists... I'm still stuck with Twombly at the moment, but it's on my list of plans (too many of them, though ;))

Lost In Wonder said...

thanks for the lessons. It's all very interesting to learn about the people behind the paintings.

Jef Nijssen said...

Casey
I'm studying Henri Matisse since a long time. I collect books and articles about him and I have visited some exhibitions in France and Germany. He is great and I still enjoy to read about him. The Matisse museums in France (Nice and Le Cateau) are very nice. His chapel is a wonder. Matisse himself called it his masterpiece and the fullfilling of his life. And I think he is right.
I wish you luck with your bloig and I hope to read something on it nore often.

Abstract Expressionism, Art Criticism, Artists, Colorist Art, Drawing, History, Impressionism, Modern Art, Painting, Pastel, Post Impressionism